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Ghostbusters (C64)

Neuer Eintrag in Rubrik Sammlung: Ghostbusters

System: C64 
Genre: Geschicklichkeit
Publisher: Activision
Anzahl Datenträger: 1 Kassette
Jahr: 1984 
Bewertung: 8/10 (Commodore User)
Bemerkung: Budget-Version von Ricochet

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I am on a Tumblr post. There is a particularly nostalgic image of a primative text adventure game. The text reads:
Playing the Hulk Questprobe text adventure for Commodore 64. I imagine I’ll be “biting lip” a lot.
Obvious exits are:
Reblog, Like, Answer, Close
What shall I do now?
■

I am on a Tumblr post. There is a particularly nostalgic image of a primative text adventure game. The text reads:

Playing the Hulk Questprobe text adventure for Commodore 64. I imagine I’ll be “biting lip” a lot.

Obvious exits are:

Reblog, Like, Answer, Close

What shall I do now?

I love this theme!

Originally the England stage theme by Yoshihiro Sakaguchi (known as Yuukichan’s Papa and later as Oyabun, this is the options and 2nd Fighter theme for the European Commodore 64/128 port of Street Fighter.

Before we had cartridges, we had these!

In the old days, games were on cassettes. That’s right! You could put these things into your dual tape deck and copy them, but if you tried to listen to them all you’d hear was electronic screeching! The games on these tapes took 5 minutes to load, so when cartridges came along they were a godsend. There was even a rumour that wearing polyester interfered with the tape when it was loading.

The three main home computers for playing games in the ’80s were the Commodore 64, the ZX Spectrum and the Amstrad CPC - they were like the Sega and Nintendo of the home computer world. The Spectrum had limited colours and sound, the C64 had superior pastel colours and music, while the Amstrad came along later and had the most vibrant colours of the three, but each one had its own loyal following. Seeing a game on all three systems was very common, with the boxes generally being identical and each system near-universally represented by a strip of colour - red for C64, yellow for the Speccy, and orange for Amstrad. There were other tape-based systems, like the BBC Micro, the Dragon 64 and the MSX, but the C64, Spectrum and Amstrad were the ‘main three’.

Before we had cartridges, we had these!

In the old days, games were on cassettes. That’s right! You could put these things into your dual tape deck and copy them, but if you tried to listen to them all you’d hear was electronic screeching! The games on these tapes took 5 minutes to load, so when cartridges came along they were a godsend. There was even a rumour that wearing polyester interfered with the tape when it was loading.

The three main home computers for playing games in the ’80s were the Commodore 64, the ZX Spectrum and the Amstrad CPC - they were like the Sega and Nintendo of the home computer world. The Spectrum had limited colours and sound, the C64 had superior pastel colours and music, while the Amstrad came along later and had the most vibrant colours of the three, but each one had its own loyal following. Seeing a game on all three systems was very common, with the boxes generally being identical and each system near-universally represented by a strip of colour - red for C64, yellow for the Speccy, and orange for Amstrad. There were other tape-based systems, like the BBC Micro, the Dragon 64 and the MSX, but the C64, Spectrum and Amstrad were the ‘main three’.